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Series: The Hospice Path

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Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photos:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photos: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

The Hospice Path, Part One: "You are not alone"

Since the 1960s, the hospice movement has been working to give Americans more options and more choices when they reach the end of their lives.

The idea is that even after we know we're dying, we can make decisions that shape the quality of our remaining time.

High Peaks Hospice and Palliative Care serves patients across a huge swath of the North Country, from Warren County all the way to St. Lawrence County.

Brian Mann has been working with the organization to profile one family that has entered the program, the Gallaghers in Saranac Lake.

In the weeks ahead, Brian's series will follow the Gallagher family, telling the story of their lives and their work with hospice.  Go to full article
Bill Gallagher as a young soldier in the 10th Mountain Division (Photo provided)

The Hospice Path, Part Two: Nearing the end, celebrating a life lived in full

Last week, we began a new on-going series called the Hospice Path.

North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at the way hospice programs across the region are changing people's lives at a time when they're forced to confront the certainty of death.

We're telling that story in part by spending time with the Gallagher family in Saranac Lake.

Bill Gallagher is 87 years old and his lungs are slowly failing.

But with the help of High Peaks Hospice, he's been able to stay at home with his wife Tomi.

In order to better describe their experience, our reporter Brian Mann decided to first spend some time asking about Bill's long life before he got sick.  Go to full article
Zelda Foster (Source:  Columbia University)

The Hospice Path, Part Three: Remembering pioneer Zelda Foster

North Country Public Radio has begun an on-going series looking at the ways that hospice programs can help when someone is approaching the end of their life.

It turns out a social worker here in New York was one of the pioneers of hospice and end-of-life care. Zelda Foster passed away in 2006.

At that time, reporter Gregory Warner profiled a woman who spent forty years advocating for people's right to die with dignity.  Go to full article
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photo:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

The Hospice Path: Helping the helpers

When a patient enters a hospice program at the end of their life, a lot of the focus is on their experience, their choices, and their preparations for death.

As...  Go to full article
Shawn Galbreath, director of High Peaks Hospice

The Hospice Path: Talking honestly about death

Over the last couple of months, we've been airing an occasional series about hospice care in the North Country.

Hospice programs provide end-of-life care,...  Go to full article
Bill & Tomi Gallagher (Photo:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Hospice Path: Dealing with depression

This morning we continue our on-going series called the Hospice Path. North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at the way hospice and palliative care programs can help...  Go to full article
Bill and Tommy Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enteprprise)

The Hospice Path: Fighting "compassion fatigue"

The last few months, we've been airing a special new series called the Hospice Path.

We've been profiling one family, the Gallaghers in Saranac Lake, who are...  Go to full article
Bill Gallagher (Photo provided)

The Hospice Path: Goodbye and what comes after

Most of us hate to talk or think about death. It may be the last taboo subject in America. But beginning last spring, Brian Mann asked one North Country family to do just...  Go to full article

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